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Intelligex Reviews: Hawking Smart Pill? Not likely!

intelli

If you spend any time online, you will come across the tiny ads like the one above. The headline is enticing. So… one of the smartest man on this planet, Stephen Hawking called a certain pill “Viagra of the brain”? Other time, “Stephen Hawking predicts this pill will change humanity”.

Click on the link and you will land on a website touting the holy grail smart pill called “Intelligex”. The site, which claims to belong to Forbes.com, states “Genius Stephen Hawking has admitted to using Intelligex to triple his memory”. The site also claims that Intelligex is endorsed by Tom Bardy, Kanye West, Bill Gates and Anderson Cooper.

Yeah, right!

There are plenty of red flags here. Firstly, the website is not the actual Forbes news site. It’s made to resemble Forbes Magazine interview. The company behind Intelligex illegally used the brand logo of Forbes magazine to make false connection between their product, CNN and Forbes magazine. Now let’s take a closer look:

The URL of Forbes magazine is: www.forbes.com

The URL of the clone site is: http://forbes.com-health.net , which is the subdomain of www.com-health.net. Obviously, it’s cybersquatting the official Forbes site.

According to the clone site, both Anderson Cooper, Bill Gates and Warren Buffet speak highly of Intelligex on CNN, which is not true at all. If you search the keywords “Intelligex” within cnn.com and forbes.com, you will find nothing:

intelli1

Perhaps most importantly, there’s no true science behind Intelligex. The markerter of Intelligex made bold claims, but none is supported by clinical studies. In fact, none of the brain-enhancing pills have been tested for their efficacy and safety.

Beware of the Free Trial
The Intelligex product page(hosted on focusnutra.com) suggests customers only need to pay for postage and packing ($4.99) for free sample. If you do not cancel within 16 days, you will be enrolled in autoship program that will bill you $89.97 every 30 day. On this website, the terms and conditions are hidden in very small type. In addition, it’s difficult to make cancellation, as reported on ripoffreport.com (source).

The Scam List
The snake oil salesmen are also touting the same stuff in different names, including:

BrainIQ Plus
Geniux
Neurocell
Synagen IQ
Cogniq
Synapsyl

Who’s behind Intelligex?
The associated domains (fake Forbes site: www.com-health.net & product site: focusnutra.com) are registered with ID protection. The information of the registrants are kept hidden. This is definitely another big red flag.

Bottom line? Stay away from this Intelligex. Don’t buy it. Remember: if something sound too good to be true, it probably is!

{ 1 comment… add one }
  • Janet C Baum July 30, 2016, 5:10 pm

    So sorry I did not do my home work on Intelligex.
    I used half of the free trial. Had a bad case of “brain fog” that I missed calling to cancel by 1 day.

    Refund reduced to $30 when I insisted on speaking to a Manager. A supervisor granted the $30 refund.

    The reason for my missing one day; the brain fog it caused, was never addressed in 3 emails I sent to the Client support dept.

    I guess I was “lucky” to get the $30.

    When I asked “do I return the bottle?” I was told “NO, keep it and let someone else use it.” What!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    There you have it.

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